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Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO‐CaCO3

Two limestones were evaluated for CaO-CaCO3 looping. Changes in the sorbent morphology during the tests were identified by scanning electron

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Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO‐CaCO3

The sorbent was regenerated at high temperature using an air‐ or Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO‐CaCO3 Looping at Pilot Scale Hughes 2009 Chemical Engineering & Technology Wiley Online Library

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(PDF) Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO

Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO-CaCO 3 Looping at Pilot Scale

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changes in limestone sorbent morphology during cao

changes in limestone sorbent morphology during cao. Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during Two limestones were evaluated for CaO CaCO3 looping Changes in the sorbent morphology during the tests were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X ray [Chat Online]

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Morphological Changes of Limestone Sorbent Particles

Mar 26, 2010Carbonation and calcination looping cycles were carried out on four limestones in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The CO2 carrying capacity of a limestone particle decays very quickly in the first 10 cycles, reducing to about 20% of its original uptake capacity after 10 cycles for the four limestones studied in this work, and it decreases further to 6−12% after 50

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Morphological analysis of sulfated Ca-based sorbents under

Dec 15, 2015Morphological characterization of two Ca-based sorbents, one limestone and one dolomite, during the sulfation process was carried out at conditions kind of oxy-fuel CFB combustion. A TGA was employed to obtain the sulfated samples. The sorbent structure and the evolution of CaSO 4 product layer were analyzed by SEM–EDX technique.

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Improved Long-Term Conversion of Limestone-Derived

Aug 06, 2004Changes in Limestone Sorbent Morphology during CaO-CaCO 3 Looping at Pilot Scale. Chemical EngineeringTechnology 2009,32 (3),425-434. DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800590.

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Study on the interaction between CaO-based sorbents and

Feb 01, 2017Calcium looping (CaL), implemented via cyclic carbonation and calcination of calcium-based sorbents, is a novel and promising technology in reducing emissions of CO 2 into the atmosphere. The reactivity of CaO is important in calcium looping, but its CO 2 sorption will be affected by the presence of ash deriving from coal combustion in the calciner. We report here,

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CaO‐Based CO2 Sorbents Effectively Stabilized by Metal

Abstract Calcium looping (i.e., CO2 capture by CaO) is a promising second‐generation CO2 capture technology. CaO, derived from naturally occurring limestone, offers an inexpensive solution, but due...

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Arturo Macchi's research works University of Ottawa

Arturo Macchi's 97 research works with 1,511 citations and 5,318 reads, including: Mini-Monoplant Technology for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

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changes in limestone sorbent morphology during cao

Effect of sulfation on CO2 capture of CaO based sorbents . The different carbonation and sulfation behavior of the CaO based sorbents should be due to the different morphological and porous structures of the sorbents The morphology of SG CaO and limestone sorbent after initial calcination and 20 cycles in the presence of SO 2 and steam was investigated by SEM

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Morphological analysis of sulfated Ca-based sorbents under

Dec 15, 2015Morphological characterization of two Ca-based sorbents, one limestone and one dolomite, during the sulfation process was carried out at conditions kind of oxy-fuel CFB combustion. A TGA was employed to obtain the sulfated samples. The sorbent structure and the evolution of CaSO 4 product layer were analyzed by SEM–EDX technique.

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Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A

Aug 06, 2010It is also a source of alumina compounds desirable in the CaO structure, which enhance micro- and nano-porosity of the sorbent. However, like other CaO-based sorbents, aluminate-based pellets lose their activity, which is especially pronounced at higher temperatures necessary during sorbent regeneration in order to produce concentrated CO 2

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Study on the interaction between CaO-based sorbents and

Feb 01, 2017Calcium looping (CaL), implemented via cyclic carbonation and calcination of calcium-based sorbents, is a novel and promising technology in reducing emissions of CO 2 into the atmosphere. The reactivity of CaO is important in calcium looping, but its CO 2 sorption will be affected by the presence of ash deriving from coal combustion in the calciner. We report here,

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CaO‐based CO2 sorbents stabilized effectively by metal

Calcium looping (i.e. CO2 capture by CaO) is a promising second‐generation CO2 capture technology. CaO derived from naturally occurring limestone offers an inexpensive solution, but due to the harsh operating conditions of the process, limestone‐derived sorbents undergo a rapid capacity decay induced by the sintering of CaCO3.

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Investigation of natural CaO–MgO sorbent for CO2 capture

The CaO–MgO sorbent has the best cyclic activity when H 2 O is present during both carbonation and calcination. H 2 O changes the sorbent morphology producing bigger particles and pores for the sintering during calcination but makes the sorbent have more stable surface area for the taking palace of the fast kinetic carbonation reaction

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Influence of Steam Injection during Calcination on the

Steam changes the morphology of the sorbent while calcination is occurring, probably causing a shift from smaller to larger pores, resulting in a structure which increases carrying capacity. It was also demonstrated that steam addition produced a larger impact on sorbent reactivity for carbonation than for calcination.

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CaO‐Based CO2 Sorbents Effectively Stabilized by Metal

Calcium looping (i.e., CO 2 capture by CaO) is a promising second‐generation CO 2 capture technology. CaO, derived from naturally occurring limestone, offers an inexpensive solution, but due to the harsh operating conditions of the process, limestone‐derived sorbents undergo a rapid capacity decay induced by the sintering of CaCO 3.Here, we report a Pechini method to

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EFFECT OF SORBENT PORE VOLUME ON THE CARBONATION

The sudden change in the reaction rate can be explained by the change in the morphology of the sorbent during the reaction. The effect of product layer thickness on the overall reaction rate has been investigated by some researchers ( Alvarez and Abanades, 2005,Grasa et al ., 2008,Mess, Sarofim and Longwell, 1999 ).

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Optimization of the structural characteristics of CaO and

Jun 19, 2018This can be achieved by ensuring a nano-structured morphology of CaO, synthesized CO 2 sorbents compared to limestone-derived CaO under harsh volumetric changes during

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CO2 Capture Performance Using Limestone Modified with

Jul 17, 2011Long-term CO 2 capture capacity of the sorbent is enhanced by modification using propionate acid, resulting in a carbonation conversion of 0.31 for modified limestone after 100 cycles, while the value for original limestone is only 0.08. The surface morphology of the modified limestone after the first calcination is much more porous and the

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Process engineering and development of post-combustion CO2

Using limestone in CaO-looping cycles is a promising capture technology to provide a cost-effective separation process to remove CO2 content from power plants operations. Limestone has the advantage of being relatively abundant and cheap, and that has already been widely used as a sorbent for sulphur capture.

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Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A

systems [21,22]. It is typically supposed that during CO2 cycles, the sorbent morphology changes, and the sorbent loses surface area and small pores, which are the main contributors to the rapid carbonation necessary for practical systems. Figure 2. Loss of sorbent (Cadomin limestone, 250–425 µm) activity during

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Reactivity of CaO-based sorbent for Calcium Looping

Reactivity of CaO-based sorbent for Calcium Looping Technology in presence of steam conditions such as temperature and pressure causes changes in the sorbent initial morphology, responsible for the sorbent decay. occurs predominantly during calcination reaction due to the higher temperatures present in this reaction (~900ºC). [8] Pore

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CaO‐Based CO2 Sorbents Effectively Stabilized by Metal

Calcium looping (i.e., CO 2 capture by CaO) is a promising second‐generation CO 2 capture technology. CaO, derived from naturally occurring limestone, offers an inexpensive solution, but due to the harsh operating conditions of the process, limestone‐derived sorbents undergo a rapid capacity decay induced by the sintering of CaCO 3.Here, we report a Pechini method to

get price

CaO‐based CO2 sorbents stabilized effectively by metal

Calcium looping (i.e. CO2 capture by CaO) is a promising second‐generation CO2 capture technology. CaO derived from naturally occurring limestone offers an inexpensive solution, but due to the harsh operating conditions of the process, limestone‐derived sorbents undergo a rapid capacity decay induced by the sintering of CaCO3.

get price

Process engineering and development of post-combustion CO2

Using limestone in CaO-looping cycles is a promising capture technology to provide a cost-effective separation process to remove CO2 content from power plants operations. Limestone has the advantage of being relatively abundant and cheap, and that has already been widely used as a sorbent for sulphur capture.

get price

Reactivity of CaO-based sorbent for Calcium Looping

Reactivity of CaO-based sorbent for Calcium Looping Technology in presence of steam conditions such as temperature and pressure causes changes in the sorbent initial morphology, responsible for the sorbent decay. occurs predominantly during calcination reaction due to the higher temperatures present in this reaction (~900ºC). [8] Pore

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An investigation of CaO sulfation mechanism in boiler

CaO-based sorbent samples were obtained from Kelly Rock limestone using three particle size ranges, each containing different impurities levels. Using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), the sulfation behavior of partially sulfated and unsulfated samples obtained after multiple calcination-carbonation cycles in a tube furnace (TF), following

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Cyclic CO2 capture by limestone‐derived sorbent during

The performance of limestone‐derived CaO during many (>1000 in some cases) calcination and carbonation cycles is reported. After 150 cycles, the calcium utilization during carbonation reached a minimum value between 4 and 17%, with the asymptotic level depending strongly on the carbonation time.

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Additive effects of steam addition and HBr doping for CaO

Sorbent morphology (pore volume and surface area) was determined using N2 adsorption/desorption (Micromeritics Tristar 3000 N2 Sorption Analyzer). Tests on the sorbent morphology were performed using Longcliffe limestone as an example, after 1 calcination, and 5 and 13 further cycles of carbonation and calcination. 3.

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Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A

systems [21,22]. It is typically supposed that during CO2 cycles, the sorbent morphology changes, and the sorbent loses surface area and small pores, which are the main contributors to the rapid carbonation necessary for practical systems. Figure 2. Loss of sorbent (Cadomin limestone, 250–425 µm) activity during

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CO2 Capture Performance Using Limestone Modified with

Jul 17, 2011Long-term CO 2 capture capacity of the sorbent is enhanced by modification using propionate acid, resulting in a carbonation conversion of 0.31 for modified limestone after 100 cycles, while the value for original limestone is only 0.08. The surface morphology of the modified limestone after the first calcination is much more porous and the

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THE USE OF A HIGH LIMESTONE CONTENT MINING WASTE

Jeboori et al., 2012) to produce synthetic sorbents, thermal preactivation of fresh sorbent (Valverde et al., 2013) and hydrating (Yu et al., 2012; Phalak et al., 2012; Blamey et al., 2010). A number of authors have shown that including an intermediate hydration of CaO improves the sorbent morphology, forming po-

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CaO featuring MgO A route to high-performance carbon

Jun 22, 2018The synthesized sorbent with a MgO content as low as 11 wt. % demonstrated a CO 2 uptake of 0.50 g CO2 /g CaO after 30 carbonation and regeneration cycles, corresponding to a capacity retention of 83% and surpassing the CO 2 uptake capacity of the limestone benchmark by more than 500%. (Authors: Andac Armutlulu and Muhammad Awais Naeem).

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E ect of Coal Combustion on the Reactivity of a CaO-Based

CaO regeneration (limestone decomposition) is an endothermic reaction and needs a lot of heat, which could be from coal combustion through mixing the coal particles and limestone particles. However, the effect of coal combustion on the CaO sorbent reactivity for CO 2 capture needs to be clarified. In this study, the reactivity of the sorbent

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Steam Enhanced Calcination for CO2 Capture with CaO

Steam changes the morphology of the sorbent during calcination, likely by shifting the pore volume to larger pores, resulting in a structure which has an increased carrying capacity. This effect was then examined at the pilot scale to determine if the phase contacting patterns and solids heat-up rates in a fluidized bed were factors.

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CO capture performance of calcium-based synthetic sorbent

The synthetic sorbent containing 5 wt.% alumina cement possesses the highest CO2 capture capacity during calcium looping cycles, which is mainly composed of CaO and Ca12Al14O33. The CO2 capture capacities of the synthetic sorbent under mild and severe calcination conditions can retain 0.37 and 0.29 g/g after 20 cycles,

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